Category Archives: Blitz announcements

Permablitz #26

Permablitz #26

Earth Wall Building Permablitz, Karangahake

New Date: Sunday 26th March 2017, 9am – 4pm  

This Blitz is now full! Thank you to the wonderful volunteers, here’s hoping that the weather holds out for us 🙂

Location: Karangahake, near Paeroa, register to find out where

We are heading back to a beautiful piece of land that we blitzed in 2015 to complete an earth wall surround to the vegetable garden.

We are fortunate to have Rose Tuffery leading this blitz. Rose is a highly experienced earthbuilder and artist in clay. She will bring her in-depth experience of working with this medium to take us through step-by-step the construction of an in situ earthen wall.

During the course of the day we will be focusing on how to;

  • source local and recycled materials for the wall
  • figure out the ideal mix
  • prepare the wall for plastering
  • prepare the mix
  • apply this clay mix to the wall
  • add creative finishing details.

A good level of fitness is recommended as the work will be quite physically demanding, with plenty of opportunity to get your hands (and feet) dirty.

Rose at trial run last Sunday

The site is west facing with a gradual slope. It is shaded in the morning but can get quite hot in the afternoon.

We will be working in a small area so numbers are limited for this blitz to a maximum of 15 registrants….so be in quick!!

As this is such a special opportunity we ask that you each bring a plate of goodies for a shared lunch. The host will provide hot and cold drinks and a few snacks.

What to bring:

-Gumboots or other footwear that can get wet/dirty

-Two types of gloves; Sturdy gardening gloves (for handling wire netting, stones, etc) and rbber gloves (for handling the mix)

-Clothing that can get dirty

-Hat and sun protection and wet weather gear

-Water bottle

-Contribution of food for a shared lunch

Optional tools and equipment (labelled with your name):

-spade or shovel

-wire cutters

-10 litre bucket

-old dish brush (for cleaning of tools and equipment)

To register please fill out the form below.

Permablitz #26

Permablitz #26
Earth Wall Building Permablitz, Karangahake

Sunday 19th March 2017, 9am – 4pm **POSTPONED till 26 MARCH
Location: Karangahake, near Paeroa, register to find out where

THIS BLITZ IS NOW FULL! THANK YOU TO THE WONDERFUL VOLUNTEERS, HERE’S HOPING THAT THE WEATHER HOLDS OUT FOR US 🙂

We are heading back to a beautiful piece of land that we blitzed in 2015 to complete an earth wall surround to the vegetable garden.

We are fortunate to have Rose Tuffery leading this blitz. Rose is a highly experienced earthbuilder and artist in clay. She will bring her in-depth experience of working with this medium to take us through step-by-step the construction of an in situ earthen wall.

During the course of the day we will be focusing on how to;

  • source local and recycled materials for the wall
  • figure out the ideal mix
  • prepare the wall for plastering
  • prepare the mix
  • apply this clay mix to the wall
  • add creative finishing details.

A good level of fitness is recommended as the work will be quite physically demanding, with plenty of opportunity to get your hands (and feet) dirty.

Rose at trial run last Sunday

The site is west facing with a gradual slope. It is shaded in the morning but can get quite hot in the afternoon.

We will be working in a small area so numbers are limited for this blitz to a maximum of 15 registrants….so be in quick!!

As this is such a special opportunity we ask that you each bring a plate of goodies for a shared lunch. The host will provide hot and cold drinks and a few snacks.

What to bring:

-Gumboots or other footwear that can get wet/dirty
-Two types of gloves; Sturdy gardening gloves (for handling wire netting, stones, etc) and rbber gloves (for handling the mix)
-Clothing that can get dirty
-Hat and sun protection and wet weather gear
-Water bottle
-Contribution of food for a shared lunch
Optional tools and equipment (labelled with your name):
-spade or shovel
-wire cutters
-10 litre bucket
-old dish brush (for cleaning of tools and equipment)

To register please fill out the form below.

 

Update on Rachel & Kaine’s PB – 4 years on

Rachel & Kaine Smith from Katikati had two blitzes….check out the progress!

We recently visited Rachel & Kaines permaculture garden which was developed over two Permablitz’s, the first in September 2012 (permablitz #6) and the second September 2013 (permablitz #13). The site was a large town garden with a mature orange tree centred on the back lawn. The family are a busy couple with two young boys, Ollie and Finn, so Rachel & Kaine wanted a garden that would grow with their family’s needs.

The design included an enlarged deck off their kitchen with raised wicking beds close at hand.

outlay

An existing area of pebble was gathered up and reused in the bottom of the wicking beds.

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The children love to climb and play around the orange tree so an area of mulch was spread beneath and around the tree, to allow some productive under-planting.

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Two existing raised vegetable gardens, much further away from the house, were also converted into wicking beds and filled with compost. The compost bin system was improved and many fruit trees were sited around the garden, including several espaliered pip fruit along the north facing fence.

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The fruit tree area near the road was planted with Feijoas, a dwarf Peach, Lemonade and Mandarin. These were thoroughly mulched in the second blitz and inter-planted with other beneficial plants; several Gooseberries, Guava and wayward herbs such as Bergamot, Lemon Balm, Calendula, Marjoram & Nasturtium. A Lemon tree was planted opposite the front door so they can just pop out the door when they need a lemon.

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On visiting recently, Rachel took great delight in showing me around her garden. Her enthusiasm was palpable and mirrored by her children who had been very involved in the blitzes right from the start.

The wicking beds near the house have been a great success, the far one now used for strawberries, the closer two connected with a plank off the deck for super- efficient harvesting. The only glitch has been with the nearest bed which was installed slightly off level, making the top end a lot drier than the bottom end. It has meant choosing hardier, drought tolerant plants for the dry end, so herbs have worked well here. They need watering once a week over summer which could have been reduced if they had been constructed a little deeper but overall the wicking beds have been very worthwhile.

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The two older beds in the far corner are a lot more productive now also with a reliable water supply from the wicking system which hardly ever needs filling. They are used for longer term vegetables that don’t need regular tending.

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The area adjacent is used to store materials such as horse, cow and chicken manure, seaweed, mulch, sawdust, grass clippings, (green waste for nitrogen and browns for carbon). These are added in layers to build a compost in the wicking beds when the soil is replaced once a year.

The area beneath the Orange tree is still used a lot by the boys so any planting here will have to wait. It proved too shady for Pumpkins but we have recommended trying Native Spinach as this should thrive in the dry semi-shade.

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Of the espaliered fruit trees on a north facing fence the Apples have been really productive already but the Pear has yet to flower. Rachel plans to interplant with a Nashi Pear as well.

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Rachel said “I knew nothing about gardening when we bought this property and I learnt largely by trial and error until getting involved in the Permablitz’s. I have learnt so much”.

Kaine said “The Permablitz’s were a positive experience. Being a kindergarten teacher the importance of our children seeing and being involved in the whole thing taking shape has been really important”.

If the sheer enthusiasm of this family is anything to go by the Permablitz programme has been very worthwhile for them. They have enriched their living environment by not only providing healthy organic food for the family but also by creating a depth of experience for their children within their property that is educational and fulfilling, and full of discoveries.

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Written by Trish Waugh, June 2016

 

Report on Permablitz # 25

Permablitz 25 kicked off at Tarariki Pottery on Old Reservoir Road, Paeroa, home of Mike O’Donnell and Trish Waugh.
A large group of 26 keen blitzers, plus the design team of Trish, Sharon, blue hat (Blitz organiser), Lia, Ailie, Katherine gathered around a fire pit to be warmly welcomed by Mike and Trish. Mike gave a karakia and described the history of the property, sharing how it has evolved and movingly expressed how we are part of their tribe that will carry the seeds of regenerating nature forward.
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Introductions included our name, where we were from and an exercise everyone could do as a warm up, literally!
Trish, Mike and the design teams’ concept plan for the day included creating a fence around the vegetable garden to keep the chickens off; sheet mulched beds around fruit trees; larger sheet mulched areas for planting smaller fruiting plants like guava and Chilean guava, vegetables e.g. silver beet and fennel as well as herbs, e.g. lavender, yarrow, calendula and Cassia ‘John Ball’ and tagastaste shrubs that fix nitrogen. This planting would create a forest garden incorporating the chooks to control small native manuka beetles that breed in the ground over winter and cause damage by eating a lot of leaves in
spring. They are distinctive in dropping to the ground when disturbed.
Everyone got stuck in clearing the overgrowth along the fence lines, and along the roadfront to ‘chicken proof’ them, the fence holes were dug and areas prepped for sheet mulching.
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Distinct edges were created around the beds for weed control. Ailie and Lia ran a workshop on sheet mulching explaining the layers, firstly the soil is limed, then cardboard laid with sellotape removed and soaked, followed by seaweed, horse manure, sawdust, comfrey, wood mulch and finally covered in rotted silage, filling our nostrils with a sweet, pungent/fermented smell, signature of farm life. Trish said comfrey tea would be poured over the mulch to kick start the composting process.
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Lia led a workshop giving us insights into the amazing life of earthworms, inviting each of us to read a pertinent fact she’d gleaned from the book ‘Organic Growing with Worms, a handbook for a better environment’ by David Murphy. I didn’t know for example that worms
swallow soil to move through it and the tunnels created are coated in nitrate rich mucous for ease of movement. These tunnels open the soil for water and oxygen. They also excrete harmless bacteria and antibiotics are found in their poo which is oxygen rich. Bad bacteria like an anaerobic environment. Lia is passionate about worms and says that worms are perfect examples of permaculture at work.
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Lunch was really delicious, beautifully prepared by Shai. There was pumpkin and coconut soup, green and rice salads, guacamole, humus, breads, a cashew chicken dish and freshly harvested mussels. Mike gave a blessing for the meal which began with him playing his flute.
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Just at the end of lunch Trish gave a mini workshop on why she created a food forest. She has modeled it on the work of Robert Hart in Shropshire who is the father of forest gardens for temperate climates. The mulched beds created are an in-between stage from orchard to forest garden. As the trees grow and the canopy closes there will be more shade and what grows will change and there will be more layers in the mix of vegetation.
After lunch activities involved planting into the sheet mulch, more work on the fence and creation of a Taranaki gate (i.e. a wire gate), and a workshop on chickens and how to clip their wings. Only the first flight feathers on one wing are cut to cause imbalance and this is enough to stop chickens flying over fences. The newly built chicken house was moved into the prepared orchard setting. It was built by Mike as a small transportable unit, light and of minimal construction.
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We completed preparation of the vegetable bed for garlic. This involved cutting down the lupins, lightly digging them in, and then covering the bed with seaweed and silage. Mike and Trish plant their garlic later than most so that it ripens and can be dug in January when the weather is dry.
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Group photo below with completed section of fence. There is more of the fence for Mike to finish.
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This was a most productive day with lots of Mike’s words of wisdom and passion to inspire us. To quote from Mike at the end of the day when he shared the healing garden with us, “ In my experience of life I believe it is all good shit. Essentially all that matters is how we are given to reply. That which comes to pass is a master teacher to us all, the past is there to find composure and to embrace, not deny, nor judge nor blame, but to turn it over as a gardener would in the making of compost, aerobically, to breathe life into it. Such does the healer embrace the disposition and the artist find the poem the song. It is within us all to creatively reply. This is a time of great challenge, when the earth is appealing to us all. To sing in the face of adversity I believe is the key to our honouring that challenge, and to realise our work is our song.”
Written by Julia Sich.

Permablitz #25!

Paeroa Rural Food Forest Permablitz

Saturday 18th June 2016, 9am – 4pm
Location: Paeroa, register to find out where

We are developing a three year old orchard into the next phase of a Food Forest. We are also preparing the orchard for chickens to roam and under planting some of the fruit trees with beneficial plants at a large rural property just south of Paeroa.

The site is a north facing, easily accessible, gently sloping orchard.

We’ll be preparing some areas of lawn between the fruit trees with sheet mulching. These areas will be planted with more fruiting plants, some nitrogen fixers and other companion and beneficial plants. Existing fruit trees will be mulched, composted and bedded in for winter.

We will be fixing chicken mesh to the perimeter fence to make the orchard secure for chickens to free range. Housing for the chickens will also be established.

Likely workshops will be; on the care of chickens eg how to clip their wings, feeding chickens from the land, sheet mulching for food forest understorey planting, pruning fruit trees, chook housing from recycled materials, healing herbs and native plants/rongoa.

Anyone is welcome to teach a workshop on a sustainable living concept so if you have any special skills that will contribute to the learning of the participants please mention this at registration.

Please come and help. The hosts will provide a good healthy lunch and snacks. Hope to see you there!

What to bring:
-Sturdy Footwear
-Gloves
-Gardening tools (labelled with your name) – hammer, grass clippers, spades, shovels,wheelbarrows, hand tools
-Water bottle
-Hat and sun protection and wet weather gear

Plants/seeds needed: Tagasaste, Peppermint geranium, Chamomile, Salvia, Siberian pea shrub, Phaelacia, Yarrow, Lavender, Wormwood.

Donations to the sheet mulching pile appreciated: Horse or cow manure, untreated sawdust, seaweed, straw…

To register, fill out the form below. Your details will be emailed to the hosts who will contact you with further details on how to get there. Thank you!

Take a look at the Katikati Motel Permablitz – 3.5 years later

This is the first in a series of reports on previous Permablitzes in the Bay of Plenty.
The Permaculture Design Guild, who make up a proportion of the designers involved in the Permablitz programme, feel it is important to return to see how the owners are enjoying their gardens and to find out what has worked and what hasn’t worked .
Our first visit was to Katikati Motel which was Permablitz # 3 & 4 carried out in spring 2012.
BEFORE
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The area we blitzed was originally a swimming pool, which had been backfilled with subsoil. We designed a series of raised wicking beds to enable addition of good growing medium and to keep maintenance to a minimum for a busy couple, Kate and Kent Pfennig, with a young
family and a motel to run.
AFTER
m2
We recently visited Kate and Kent at Katikati Motel to see how their garden is going. This was a unique situation as Kate and Kent wanted this area to be developed for guests at the Motel to also be able to use the fruit and vegetables from the garden.
THIS IS WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE TODAY
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This was the first Blitz where we built Wicking beds and these have proved very successful for this busy couple. Kate says “I would do the wicking beds again, that was a definite good thing. They only need filling two to three times a year; at the end of spring, around January, and if very dry, again a month later. They have been great time and water savers when it comes to irrigating the vegetables.
kk motel
The beds are replenished with fresh compost at the end of each growing season. “The Pfennigs wanted to incorporate chickens into the area so that they could also provide guests with fresh eggs. The  rotational chicken tractor system hasn’t been continued with mainly because it was in the public eye and the area, especially after rain, wasn’t visually appealing for the guests.
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However the chickens are now housed elsewhere and when there were nine laying they not only provided ample eggs for the guests but also were fed food waste from the units thus closing the recycle loop. There have been crops of potatoes, corn, beans, herbs, and fruit. Raspberries, Grapes, Citrus, and Jerusalem Artichokes are currently ripe. The Pfennigs have since planted other fruit throughout the motel site. There are Olives as shade trees, more Raspberries against a hot wall,Citrus and Green Tea Camellias.
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Since completion there have been visits to this garden by the Tauranga Ooooby Group, a Tauranga Garden Club and Katikati BA5. It has generated a lot of interest and provided a good example of Permaculture in action.
By Trish Waugh, Permablitz guild designer

Report on Permablitz # 24

An energetic group of 22 people came together on Saturday 10th October to blitz a suburban backyard in Brookfield, Tauranga.

Host Sharon created the design for her PDC with Plenty Permaculture and this was implementation day!

sharon-and-design

The main task of the day was to create a series of small-scale infiltration swales on contour with vegetable beds in between. This will take advantage of the gentle slope of the property to harvest rainwater runoff.

digging-and-filling-swales

The swales were lined with tree branches, mulch and sawdust, which will act like a sponge during heavy rain, then will slowly release moisture to the vegetable beds. The swales also function as pathways between the beds.

The vegetable beds were prepared by double-digging and adding amendments such as inoculated biochar, vermicast, Nature’s Garden and compost.

The vegetable growing area will be divided into two parts: a perennial vegetable polyculture, which will be self-sustaining once established; and annual vegetable beds which will be managed using biointensive methods.

finishing-touches

Three interactive workshops were run to give everyone some fun, hands-on learning opportunities. Leo did a compost making workshop which resulted in a magnificent compost heap; Brad demonstrated double-digging and had his group powering through the vegetable beds; and Christine led a willow weaving workshop which resulted in a cute and rustic raised bed border (to be finished by host Sharon later).

compost-creation

willow-weaving

The lunch of chickpea and pumpkin tagine, arabesque lentils, salads, roasted chicken, lemon and coconut balls, chocolate chip slice and fruit cake was lovingly assembled by our generous hosts.

lunch

As we were munching dessert, Gisella gave us a fabulous introduction to biodynamic gardening. We learned that biodynamic gardening always starts with applying a preparation called 500. It’s an involved process to make it, using cow horns packed with cow manure and buried in the ground. However you can purchase it through the NZ Biodynamic Association at a very low cost per acre. A few of the group decided to try it, so we put in our order with Gisella and will meet up in a couple of weeks when the moon is in the right phase to have a strong arm stirring party (500 needs to be stirred for an hour to activate it).

Facilitators Trish and Leo kept things running smoothly and it was a fun and productive day with amazing results!

the-crew

final-result